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Technology

Lawwly Developer Update: The FRE Learning Portal

Thursday, April 2, 2020

We are very proud to announce our first web module release: The Federal Rules of Evidence Interactive Learning Portal.

Written by:

Lawwly Dev Team

Views:

150

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Our jurisprudence has dramatically evolved since the enactment of the Federal Rules of Evidence in 1975. For the first time in U.S. history, a rulebook of codes, rather than case law, stood as the deciding authority on the admissibility of evidence in Federal courts. 


However, as any practitioner of the Rules would tell you, the Rules as written were neither comprehensive nor really “rules” in the ordinary sense. Rather, they promulgate general principles or standards, supplemented by secondary materials such as the Advisory Committee Notes and subject to interpretation. As a result, a large body of caselaw both prior to and after the enactment of the Rules continue to be an important area of study for practitioners and students alike. 


Today, the Rules continue to be an important touchstone of all legal education. Even lawyers who have never set foot in a federal court will tell you about their run-in with the Rules during their studies in law school. Most casebooks today continue to use the Rules as a starting point for further studies in the body of evidentiary law. 


Today, as law students prepare themselves for the bar exam, character evidence, hearsay, and relevance are the most frequently tested.

For these reasons, we are very proud to announce our first web module release: The Federal Rules of Evidence Interactive Learning Portal. 


When we were deciding on our first web module release, we discovered that currently available learning modules were outdated, clunky, and largely deficient in providing students of the law with a proper 2020-era learning tool. What’s worse, the available online references to the Rules exist solely on websites that were probably built around the time the Rules were enacted in 1975. Thus, in an effort to promote our core values of proliferating online legal learning and education for all, we’re very excited to bring this free module to you. 


On the front page, you’ll see a user-friendly interface designed bring you directly to the particular Rule you’re looking for.


In the coming weeks, we’ll be releasing relevant Case Law along with a printer-friendly, downloadable quick-reference card of the Rules. We’re in the process of gathering the Advisory Committee Notes as well. 


Finally, as a part of our Noggin project, we’re experimenting with interactive quizzes and tests to help you better learn the Rules. While we plan on offering this feature only to premium members, feel free to test out our module for free as it gets released.

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