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Government

Everything You Need To Know About Amy Coney Barrett's Confirmation

Saturday, October 17, 2020

The final days of Amy Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation are upon us. Here's everything you need to know about her and the process.

Written by:

Lawwly Contributor

Views:

565

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Tired of being pulled apart by the pointless partisan drama that is Amy Coney Barrett’s Supreme Court confirmation?


We are too. Believe it or not, many Americans are confused about how the rule of law works and how the confirmation hearings should be conducted.


They’re not to blame, given the amount of misdirection and overexaggerating of partisan brawls by mainstream media. We’re here to clear that confusion up, so here’s an objective look at how confirmations are supposed to go, and what’s really going on.


Americans have no idea why these hearings are even held.


The United States Constitution gives the President the power to appoint Supreme Court Justices under the Appointment Power provided in Article II, Section 2. The “Advice and Consent of the Senate” language contained therein gives the Senate the power to examine judicial nominees and reject those they deem unqualified.


That’s why we have the hearings. To confirm whether a nominee is qualified to be a Supreme Court Justice. What constitutes qualification for such a role?


Americans seem to think it has to do with the person’s subjective views. That’s not the case at all. A Supreme Court Justice upholds the rule of law.


She does not uphold a republican or democratic agenda. She faithfully observes only cases and controversies brought before the court, and keeps an open mind when hearing arguments.


She does not make a gut-decision on a case based on her subjective beliefs.


She remains neutral, and respects precedent to the extent that the law is an embodiment of the evolution of mankind. Believe it or not, this is exactly what she testified to the Senate on the day of the hearing.


She knows her stuff, and her subjective beliefs cannot and will not affect her role as a justice.


No matter what her personal beliefs are, a Supreme Court justice is not supposed to bring that into the courtroom.

Additionally, it's not the job of the Supreme Court or its justices to provide advisory opinions. An advisory opinion is one that does not involve a “case or controversy.”


That’s why the Senators continued to ask what seemed like “partisan” questions, in an attempt to have her show her views on such matters.


Barrett stuck to her guns, remembering her role as a current Article III judge to not render such opinions. Amy Coney Barrett’s confirmation into the Supreme Court is inevitable.


Whether she’ll overturn Roe v. Wade, ban gay marriage and abortion, or otherwise destroy our entire nation is mere puffery that the Senators and media would have you believe and speculate upon.


Of course, without any knowledge of how the law works, one could be easily drawn into such ridiculous notions. Take it upon yourself to educate yourself and browse our free resources available to the public.


Continued ignorance of the law continues ignorance of the law.

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Senate Confirms Amy Coney Barrett as 103rd Supreme Court Justice

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The Drama of the Online Bar Exam, the NCBE, and 2020 Bar Examinees

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2020 Survey Shows $165K Average Law Student Debt at Graduation

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